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With climate concern at all-time high, consumers want action more than promises

With climate concern at all-time high, consumers want action more than promises

In the wake of the COP26 talks, we again find ourselves critically analyzing the success of what is arguably the world’s most important summit. Were the commitments strong enough? Will those in power live up to the commitments?

To bring current perspectives to life on climate change, I will draw from several recent GlobeScan research studies. In partnership with the SustainAbility Institute by ERM, the 2021 Climate Survey "Responding to Humanity’s Code Red" is the latest edition of our collaboration surveying experts in climate change and sustainability — including NGOs, corporates, government and academics around the world. Alongside that data, the GlobeScan Radar research has tracked global public opinion on climate change since 1998, making it one of the most reputable sources of climate opinion. Together, these data sources tell a rich story over time of increasing ecoanxiety and an intensifying call to action on the biggest challenge humanity has faced.

Concern about climate change has reached its highest point recorded since GlobeScan first started tracking this metric in our annual Radar public opinion survey. Across 17 countries consistently tracked since 1998, 63 percent of people believe climate change is a "very serious" issue. Crucially, since the Paris Agreement in 2015, concern has increased substantially despite the disruption caused by a global pandemic. Our research suggests COVID-19 awakened many people to how vulnerable we are to nature as a society.

It is no surprise, therefore, to see that there is almost universal agreement globally (90 percent across 31 markets) that society should respond to climate change with the same urgency as it has responded to the current pandemic, especially among people in emerging markets who are also more likely to understand that climate change disproportionally affects poor people.
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