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Grid-Interactive Buildings are Key in Fight Against Climate Change

Grid-Interactive Buildings are Key in Fight Against Climate Change

When most people think about major contributors to climate change, the image that comes to mind is a coal-fired power plant. The burning of coal accounts for 46 percent of carbon dioxide emissions worldwide and is often cited as climate change enemy number one. But in the past few years, there has been increasing focus on another top climate change factor, commercial buildings. Fossil-fuel combustion connected to residential and commercial buildings accounts for roughly 29 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, according to the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions. If the world plans to reach the Paris Climate Agreement targets to limit the rise of global temperatures this century to below two degrees Celsius, it’s clear the global built environment must become much cleaner and energy-efficient.

Carbon dioxide emissions from commercial buildings hit record-high levels in 2019, according to the Global Alliance for Building and Construction. That’s partly because there has been a shift away from the direct use of coal, oil, and biomass towards electricity to power buildings, but electricity has had higher carbon content because of the high proportion of fossil fuels used in generation. Many property owners are taking note of building climate change impacts because of growing environmental and energy-efficiency regulations targeting CRE. Fortunately, a significant boom in new technologies will help tremendously in pursuing net-zero emissions for commercial buildings that’ll help fight climate change and also lower energy bills.

There’s currently a significant push in real estate for what’s called grid-interactive efficient buildings (GEBs) that make buildings into clean and flexible energy resources.

“Grid-interactive efficient buildings are designed to avoid the high costs and disruptions associated with peak demand and grid stress,”


When most people think about major contributors to climate change, the image that comes to mind is a coal-fired power plant. The burning of coal accounts
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